Resources for Recovering Resilience: How We Learn to Change Brains, Change Lives

I’ll be learning a great deal myself in the coming months as my teachings/trainings stretch into new territory: working with kids, with physicians, with pastors, with people in Germany whose history and culture of resilience is very different from the American experience. Please join me if you can, and spread the word if you can, for these new adventures in rewiring the brain for more resilience and well-being.]

September 26, 2015
Mindful Awareness Research Center
Los Angeles, CA

Shift Happens: Learning to Bounce Back from Disappointment, Difficulty, even Disaster

Mindfulness and compassion are among the most powerful agents of brain change, thus behavior change, known to modern science. A wise use of Buddhist contemplative practices and tools from modern relational psychology can help practitioners harness the innate neuroplasticity of their brains to deepen self-awareness and self-compassion, reverse the impact of stress and trauma, come out of anxiety, depression, loneliness, guilt, shame and rewire the inner critic. Participants in this daylong learn to connect to inner resources and to relationships that are healthy and nourishing and, through mindful awareness and reflection, discern options and make the wise choices that lead to inner peace, equanimity, well-being, thriving and flourishing. Participants learn to navigate the challenges and crises of their lives with more calm, courage, flexibility and resilience.

October 5-6, 2015
Changing Brains, Changing Lives Symposium
Aspen, CO

The Neuroscience of Resilience

Early attachment experiences teach children basic coping strategies for dealing with adversity and difficulties in life; they also develop (or de-rail) the structures in the brain we need to learn more resilient coping strategies later on.

Modern neuroscience is illuminating the tools and techniques that parents, educators, and mental health professionals can use to help children and teens stabilize a secure sense of self, develop new, more adaptive behaviors, and improve their learning and thriving.

October 15-December 10, 2015
Spirit Rock Meditation Center
Woodacre, CA

Mindful Self-Compassion

Mindful Self-Compassion, as developed by Kristin Neff and Christopher Germer, is a powerful 8-week training in empirically-supported tools and techniques that enable participants to respond to difficult moments in their lives with kindness, care, understanding, and wise action.

Practices in loving kindness and compassion allow us to keep our hearts open in moments of struggle and suffering. Practices in mindfulness allow us to see our experiences and our reactions to our experiences, and ourselves as the experiencer, more clearly, discern options and make wise choices.

Understanding our common humanity brings us out of isolation into connection and resources again. MSC, through discussions, meditations, and many experiential exercises, teaches practices of loving connected presence that allows us not just to feel better but to cope wisely when we are feeling bad.

This course helps participants deal effectively with life’s challenges and crises while creating community and deepening practice.

October 17, 2015
Kaiser Physician Wellness: Happiness: Evidence-Based Research
Oakland, CA

The Neuroscience of Resilience

Focusing on wellness, self-care, recovery from burn-out, recovering resilience and well-being for physicians impacted by changes Medicare and California Coverage bring to the medical system.

October 19, 2015
International Congress of Pastoral Care and Counseling
Burlingame, CA

The Impact of Technology on Spiritual Care

Human brains are wired for connection – with fellow human beings, with the divine. Modern digital technology can support or short-circuit that connection. Modern neuroscience illuminates how conscious, compassionate connections among people rewire the brain, recovering resilience within one’s self and resonance in relationships.

October 24, 2015
New York Open Center
New York, NY

Change Your Brain, Change Your Life: The Neuroscience of Well-Being

More and more cutting edge neuroscientific research is revealing that our brains are far more adaptable and resilient than previously thought. This means that, armed with the right understanding, we can judiciously use new behaviors, practices and approaches to life to “rewire” some of the neural pathways in our brains, allowing us to radically change our mindset and enhance our effectiveness and happiness.

October 28-November 1, 2015
Arbor-Seminare
Freiburg, Germany
Bouncing Back: Rewiring Your Brain for Resilience and Well-Being

Dealing effectively with the challenges and crises of life is the core of our resilience and well-being. Developing flexible and adaptive strategies for coping with everyday disappointments and extraordinary disasters is the heart of any transformative process.

Modern neuroscience is discovering how the brain encodes its strategies for coping in the first place and illuminates how we can learn to use our own self-directed neuroplasticity to rewire strategies that no longer work so well, even strengthen the structures of the brain that develop rather then derail our resilience.

In this presentation, participants will learn to reverse the impact of stress and trauma, come out of anxiety, depression, addictions, grief, loneliness, guilt and shame, and rewire the inner critic. Participants learn to deepen their self-compassion and empathy, connect to inner resources and to the relationships that are healthy and nourishing, and through mindful awareness and reflection discern options and make wise choices.

November 14, 2015
Insight L.A.
Santa Monica, CA

Shift Happens: Learning to Bounce Back from Disappointment, Difficulty, Even Disaster

Dealing effectively with the challenges and crises of life is the core of our resilience and well-being. Developing flexible and adaptive strategies for coping with everyday disappointments and extraordinary disasters is the heart of any transformative process.

Modern neuroscience illuminates how the brain encodes its strategies for coping in the first place and has shown mindfulness and compassion practices to be two of the most powerful agents of brain change, thus behavior change, known to science. A wise use of Buddhist contemplative practices and tools from modern relational psychology can help practitioners let go of unwholesome coping strategies and cultivate new, more wholesome ones, leading to more clarity, response flexibility and resilience, and less greed, hatred, delusion and suffering.

In this daylong, participants will learn to reverse the impact of stress and trauma, come out of anxiety, depression, addictions, grief, loneliness, guilt and shame, and rewire the inner critic. Participants learn to deepen their self-compassion and empathy, connect to inner resources and to the relationships that are healthy and nourishing, and through, mindful awareness and reflection, discern options and make wise choices that lead to thriving and well-being.

December 13-15, 2015
Esalen Institute
Big Sur, CA

Bouncing Back: The Neuroscience of Resilience and Well-Being

Welcome to an experiential weekend of strengthening your inner resources and the natural resilience that supports your well-being and flourishing.

You’ll be taught more than a dozen tools and techniques drawn from the intersection of brain science, relational psychology, and mindfulness practices. These can help you reduce the impact of stress and trauma, deepen your self-compassion and self-awareness, and broaden perspectives, possibilities, and sense of purpose. The practical experiential exercises, guided meditations and visualizations, inquiry in dyads and small groups, and stimulating dialogue and discussion in large groups, will help you harness your own self-directed neuroplasticity to rewire your brain for maximum resilience and well-being. You can learn new and creative ways to navigate the twists and turns of life with more calm, courage, and flexibility.